Through our partner program, we’re practicing what we preach: helping communities install and experience solar power

Making it real

By 2050, solar power is expected to be the world’s largest source of electricity.

Solar Now seeks to engage Canadians in the global shift to renewable energy by creating opportunities for people to see and experience solar power firsthand.

Through the program, solar electricity systems are being installed on prominent public sites in communities across Western Canada—municipal buildings, schools, libraries, community centres, even electric vehicle charging stations.

With each installation, Solar Now aims to demonstrate how communities can produce their own power while helping fight climate change by generating clean, renewable electricity from the sun.

Pictured above: Clean Energy Canada executive director Merran Smith speaks to media at the launch of the Creekside Paddling Centre solar installation in Vancouver

Completed Solar Now installations

Cranbrook

District of Sparwood

Bowen Island Community School

Vancouver Public Library

Creekside Paddling Centre

Radium

Invermere

Cranbrook

Cranbrook

The Ktunaxa Nation Council in Cranbrook partnered with Solar Now to install a large solar array on its Government Building, featuring 119 solar panels with a generating capacity of 40 kilowatts. This translates to 45,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity each year—equivalent to the power used by four typical homes. The project is complemented by an electric vehicle charging station—part of the Accelerate Kootenays network.

District of Sparwood

District of Sparwood

This small municipality in the Kootenay region—with a historical dependence on coal mining—has brought a new vision to the community with two solar panel installations, one on the Sparwood Town Hall and the other on the Leisure Centre. The 44 panels, spread over the two buildings, have a combined capacity of 12 kilowatts.

Bowen Island Community School

Bowen Island Community School

A 30-panel, eight-kilowatt solar installation is in operation on this elementary school in the West Vancouver School District, providing the school with renewable power and students with a learning opportunity. The school received additional funding support for the project from the Bowen Island Community Foundation and the community-run Knick Knack Nook.

Vancouver Public Library

Vancouver Public Library

The City of Vancouver partnered with Solar Now to install a solar system along the perimeter of its rooftop garden. The system consists of fifty-two 320-watt solar panels that generate 17,500 kilowatts of electricity per year—enough energy to power the LED lights on one of the newly renovated library floors.

Creekside Paddling Centre

Creekside Paddling Centre

Completed in partnership with the City of Vancouver, this installation features 60 solar modules over six boat sheds with a total generating capacity of 15 kilowatts. That’s more than enough power to meet the needs of a typical home in B.C. Over its lifetime, the system will feed 459,000 kilowatt-hours of clean electricity back into the grid, generating $62,000 in electricity at current rates while offsetting a portion of the energy used at the nearby Creekside Community Recreation Centre.

Radium

Radium

The East Kootenay village of Radium Hot Springs partnered with Solar Now to install solar panels on the rooftop of its new Community Centre. The panels generate energy for its three new electric vehicle charging stations—all part of the Accelerate Kootenays network.

Invermere

Invermere

The town of Invermere, located in the East Kootenay region, has outfitted its new multi-use facility, the Columbia Valley Centre, with 138 solar panels. The 9.6-kilowatt system produces 49,500 watts annually, which represents approximately $6,900 worth of energy per year at current electricity prices.

Our partners

Each installation is funded via a private charitable donation from the North Growth Foundation that is matched by the involved municipality, institution, and/or other project partners.

Get in touch

To learn more about Solar Now or to get involved, please contact project director Bill Swan.