Author: Sarah Petrevan

Sarah leads our provincial work in Ontario, with a focus on our carbon and electricity programs. An accomplished professional with more than 10 years of experience in policy and public affairs, Sarah is versed in all facets of strategic planning, communications, and relationship building. Prior to joining Clean Energy Canada she served as director of public affairs for the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation, supporting effective land-use planning, and held several senior positions with the Province of Ontario.

Sarah Petrevan's Recent Articles:

Share: If you want proof that carbon pricing is both an environmental and economic solution, take a walk through the headquarters of Markham-based Pond Technologies. What you’ll find are containers and tanks bubbling green with algae that efficiently suck up greenhouse-gas emissions for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The company has spent years perfecting the process…

Share: Looking for a job in clean technology? They must be easy to spot, with more than 850 rms nationally employing more Canadians than the forestry, pharmaceutical, or medical device industries. In fact, there are more Canadian cleantech companies than aerospace (700) or automotive (450) rms. But would you recognize a clean technology job if…

Share: TORONTO—Sarah Petrevan, senior policy advisor at Clean Energy Canada, commented today on the release of the summary report from Ontario’s first cap and trade auction: “Today’s results are a vote of confidence in Ontario’s cap and trade system. With virtually 100 per cent of the available 2017 allowances sold, the province is on the…

Share: Opening the Government of Canada’s budget papers last week felt strangely celebratory. Budget day happened to fall on my birthday, and one of the policies I care about most is getting public procurement right. So it felt like unwrapping a gift when I read Ottawa’s new procurement plans, which will help spark clean energy…

Share: Amidst the flurry of headlines about the 2017 federal budget, Ontario held its first cap and trade auction last week. While it will take a few more weeks for the results to be calculated and posted, let’s review why Ontario decided to price carbon pollution in the first place, and why it’s the right…

Share: In a new report released this morning, the Fraser Institute paints a simplistic portrait of Ontario’s coal phaseout—the single largest greenhouse gas reduction initiative in North America to date. Evaluating the coal phaseout solely on the basis of particulate matter and air quality misses the bigger picture—that burning coal for energy contributes to climate…

Share: Electricity is a big deal in Ontario. Whether driven by public outcry over rising rates or the propensity of politicians to respond, you can’t turn a corner—let alone the pages of a newspaper—without hearing something about electricity. So perhaps it’s not surprising that Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault spoke Monday at what the Empire…

Share: As Canada heads to Marrakech to kickstart the Paris Agreement—which compels governments around the globe to take carbon pollution out of their economies—our national climate policies are starting to take shape at home. Last week’s announcement by the feds to “green government” seems like a small step in the right direction as we make the…

Share: OTTAWA—Sarah Petrevan, senior policy advisor at Clean Energy Canada, responded today to the federal government’s commitment to cut carbon emissions from government operations by 40 per cent by 2030, and use 100 per cent clean power in all operations run by Public Services and Procurement Canada by 2025:     “By committing to use…

Share: We’ve seen both pride and prejudice in the weeks leading up to the release of Ontario’s five year climate action plan. The consultation and pending rollout of the province’s cap-and-trade system, the presentation of legislation to support climate action measures, and the untimely leak of cabinet documents created high drama and left stakeholders and…

Share: Province charts course to cut pollution and grow the clean economy TORONTO—The Government of Ontario today released its Five Year Climate Action Plan, which outlines 28 key initiatives to help the province meet its carbon pollution reduction targets. These initiatives include the establishment of a ‘green bank’, a low-carbon fuel standard and support for…

Share: TORONTO—Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli announced today the province will add 930 MW of renewable energy—enough to power approximately 250,000 average Canadian homes—from solar photovoltaic, wind, hydroelectric and bioenergy sources, through the Independent Electricity System Operator’s Large Renewable Procurement Process.  QUOTES Sarah Petrevan, a senior policy advisor at Clean Energy Canada, made the following…

Share: In our line of work, one of the most common questions asked is, “What’s the one thing governments can do to grow renewable energy technology in Canada?” And while it would be challenging to limit the answer to one individual action, there is one policy that supersedes all others in driving the growth of…

Share: The big energy story in Canada continues to be pipelines. Still. Why? There’s controversy, for starters, but it’s also the fact that energy exports – especially oil – make up a big chunk of Canada’s exports, and we’re an export-driven economy. “Whether you build the next pipeline or not … the economy of Canada…

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